A Background of the Pitzer Outback

一道本不卡免费高清The Pitzer Outback Preserve is a 3.4 acre parcel of land owned by Pitzer College, and is a part of the John Rodman Arboretum. This arboretum began in 1984 in efforts to save indigenous vegetation from demolition during the development of the college campus. The Outback is a section of a rare ecosystem, Alluvial Sage Scrub.

Some of the plants included in this area of land are: Coast Live Oak, Black Sage, Golden Current, Lemonade Berry, Yerba Santa, Hollyleaf Cherry, Redberry, Laurel Sumac, California Buckwheat, White Sage, Coffeeberry, Scale Broom, Our Lord’s Candle, Mexican Elderberry, Coastal Prickly Pear, Cholla, and California Sagebrush.

一道本不卡免费高清This land is being restored and utilized by classes taught by Paul Faulstich, Environmental Analysis Professor at Ptizer College. The map below is an effort to help visitors to better understand what the Pitzer Outback looks like and its purpose, as well as to urge students to walk along the various paths in the Outback and experience the many niches in this land.

Photo Gallery

Pitzer Outback Photo Map

Pitzer Outback Photo Map: Site 1

This is the first seating area that you will find in the outback. It is surrounded by a Mexican Elderberry tree as well as newly planted shrubs.

Pitzer Outback Photo Map: Site 2

This seating area is surrounded by many Yerba Santa shrubs and when facing west in the spot has an expansive view of the whole outback.

Pitzer Outback Photo Map: Site 3

This seating area was previously named Paulstich Corner and is in a transition period with many newly planted native plants. This seating area is one that will change dramatically over time

Pitzer Outback Photo Map: Site 4

This is one of the few seating areas in the outback that gives a sense of enclosure due to the wooden fence and overhanging Laurel Sumac tree.

Pitzer Outback Photo Map: Site 5

This is the only photo that is not a seating area, but instead shows the expansive views that you will experience in the outback. Most of what is pictured ahead is Yerba Santa, a common sage scrub plant.